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20 January 2016
English

Forests, climate change, and equity in Viet Nam: REDD+ equity challenges and solutions according to national stakeholders

uploaded by RECOFTC The Center for People and Forests

Equity has featured prominently in international climate change discussions since the establishment of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992. Looking forward, equity is expected to be of even greater relevance in this year’s hoped for landmark climate agreement, to be finalized at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) remains a focal point of global debate at the intersection of forest and climate change policy. While the exact financing mechanism for REDD+ has yet to be determined, it is clear that demonstrating equity will be an essential part of accessing REDD+ payments and financing in the future.

At the national level, Viet Nam recognizes the importance of equity for ensuring an effective REDD+ framework. Therefore, this brief is designed to present key REDD+ equity challenges, as identified by national policy makers and stakeholders in Viet Nam, and potential solutions to address those challenges. By highlighting national equity priorities identified during a workshop held in advance of COP21, we aim to ensure that future capacity development efforts are directed where there is the greatest need and national buy-in. The priority equity issues identified in Viet Nam include: tenure and resource rights, access to information, and benefit sharing.

20 January 2016
English

Forests, climate change, and equity in Lao PDR: REDD+ equity challenges and solutions according to national stakeholders

uploaded by RECOFTC The Center for People and Forests

Equity has featured prominently in international climate change discourse since the establishment of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992. Looking forward, equity is expected to be of even greater relevance in this year’s hoped for landmark climate agreement, to be finalized at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) remains central in global conversations at the intersection of forest and climate change policy. While the exact financing mechanism for REDD+ has yet to be determined, it is clear that demonstrating equity will be essential for accessing REDD+ financing in the future.

Lao PDR recognizes the importance of equity for ensuring an effective REDD+ framework. Therefore, this brief is designed to present key REDD+ equity challenges as identified by national policy makers and other stakeholders in Lao PDR and potential solutions to address those challenges. By highlighting national equity priorities identified during a workshop held in advance of COP21, we aim to ensure that future capacity development efforts are directed where there is the greatest need and national buy-in. Priority equity issues identified in Lao PDR include: benefit sharing, participation and decision making, and livelihoods.

20 January 2016
English

Forests, climate change, and equity in Cambodia: REDD+ equity challenges and solutions according to national stakeholders

uploaded by RECOFTC The Center for People and Forests

Equity has featured prominently in international climate change discourse since the establishment of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992. Looking forward, equity is expected to be of even greater relevance in this year’s hoped for landmark climate agreement, to be finalized at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) remains a focal point of global debate at the intersection of forest and climate change policy. While the exact financing mechanism for REDD+ has yet to be determined, it is clear that demonstrating equity will be an essential part of accessing REDD+ payments and financing in the future.

At the national level, Cambodia recognizes the importance of equity for ensuring an effective REDD+ framework. Therefore, this brief is designed to present key REDD+ equity challenges as identified by national policy makers and other stakeholders in Cambodia and potential solutions to address those challenges. By highlighting national equity priorities identified during a workshop held in advance of COP21, we aim to ensure that future capacity development efforts are directed where there is the greatest need and national buy-in. Priority REDD+ and forest governance equity elements identified in Cambodia include: participation and decision-making, governance and regulations, and access to information.

20 January 2016
English

Equity in forests and REDD+: An analysis of equity challenges as viewed by forestry decision-makers and practitioners in Cambodia, Lao PDR and Viet Nam

uploaded by RECOFTC The Center for People and Forests

Considerable debate has developed in recent years over the potential of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) to either rectify or exacerbate social inequities in tropical forest countries. Despite agreement on the importance of equity issues in REDD+, few studies have considered differences in equity and equitable outcomes as understood at national and local levels, and related contextspecific barriers that frustrate the achievement of equitable outcomes. This paper surveys perceptions of REDD+ related challenges to equity and potential solutions of forestry decision-makers and practitioners in three Mekong countries.

Responses were analyzed from two sets of workshops conducted at the national and subnational levels in Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Viet Nam from 2013 to 2015. The paper draws on a framework for analysis of equity developed in recent REDD+ research, and eight “equity elements” developed in the course of the first set of workshops. Participant responses were compared across workshops in the same countries (i.e., national level versus local level) and across countries. Responses also were compared with recent literature on equity in REDD+ and forest governance in each country.

The results show that perceptions of equity differ deeply on international, national, and subnational levels. Participation, access to information, and benefit sharing were the most common equity challenges cited across groups, with tenure also seen as important. Workshop participants’ concerns regarding equity were highly interrelated, suggesting that work on equity is mutually reinforcing. Participants’ views on key equity challenges largely supported external research findings. However, feedback also suggested participation and access to information (at least in Cambodia and Viet Nam, respectively) are more important equity issues than seen in literature.

Recommendations based on the work include:

-Further research to better understand the local level perceptions on equity, enabling more targeted capacity development efforts.
-Capacity development initiatives should include further efforts to increase awareness among forest communities of forest governance and REDD+ related rights and mechanisms. The awareness raising should include utilizing the potential of increasing internet and mobile communication coverage.
-Current capacity development programs for subnational level government officials, on a wide range of technical skills (e.g., training on relevant laws, policies, and regulations) and ‘soft’ skills (e.g., participatory facilitation and communications with local communities), needs to be revisited and strengthened.

07 July 2013
English

Discussion_paper_Final_20130617_FLC

uploaded by Tim Cadman

This discussion paper presents the Action Research Project to Develop a National Quality-of-governance Standard for REDD+ and the Forest Sector in Nepal, which was launched by IGES, Griffith University and the University of Southern Queensland.

The process of developing a voluntary national standard in Nepal through online surveys, key informant interviews, a multi-stakeholder forum and field consultation, has provided an innovative and field-tested apporach to standards development.

19 February 2013
English

Governing the Forests: An Institutional Analysis of REDD+ and Community Forest Management in Asia

uploaded by Tim Cadman


ITTO and UNU-IAS, February 2013 | ISBN: ISBN 978-92-808-4542-6

This report aims to serve as a useful reference for policymakers, professionals and practitioners as they work to promote REDD+ in ways that tackle climate change and biodiversity loss but also respect concerns and listen to the voice of local stakeholders. It presents a background on REDD+, explores ways to link REDD+ to community forestry, and provides lessons learned and recommendations.

The report explores case studies from Bangladesh, India and Indonesia, focusing on successful examples of forest-based climate change mitigation at the community level, and the role of public-private partnerships for community forestry and REDD+. Each presents a different system of forest governance, with varying degrees of community management and success. In reviewing the case studies, the authors conclude that local systems will be a key to the successful outcome of any global efforts for carbon payment schemes in developing countries. Linking community forestry and REDD+ can deliver multiple benefits from climate change mitigation and adaptation, livelihood development and strengthened sustainable forest management (SFM). Criteria for success identified in the report include: linking community forests to international regimes, including those aimed at addressing climate change, promoting biodiversity conservation and sustainable use, as well as building strong local institutions for forest management; connecting carbon management to local forest management practices and economic activities; establishing community benefit sharing; and clarifying land tenure and resource use rights. The report also emphasizes the importance of strong monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems, not only as it relates to carbon accounting and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, but also with regard to the participation of interested parties in decisions regarding the sharing of benefits arising from payments for ecosystem services, and overall forest management.

19 August 2011
English

Land Tenure and REDD - USAID - August 2011

uploaded by Estelle Fach

This paper focuses on understanding how mitigation efforts based on reducing emissions and increasing sequestration by forests (REDD+) may interact with property rights and, by extension, poverty and economic growth for smallholders. Author: Matt Sommerville

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