Showing 601 result(s) for:
Tags: Stakeholder Engagement
12 December 2019
English

Viet Nam Infobrief Series: Medicine from the forest - Medicine for the forest

uploaded by Leona Liu

Traditional therapeutic medicine in Viet Nam has a long history. Treatments based on medicinal plants are still often used in addition to, or even instead of, allopathic medicine by many Vietnamese. Viet Nam is home to an estimated 12,000 species of high-value plants, of which 10,500 have been identified. Approximately 36 percent of those are known to have medicinal properties. Herbal and aromatic plants are used to make soaps, bath solutions and medicines, such as balms for pain relief, and also supply modern pharmaceutical production chains. 

Since the mid-1990s, several once-abundant medicinal plants have been threatened with extinction from over-exploitation. In this respect, Viet Nam’s experience is similar to that of many other countries in the region, such as with blueberries in Mongolia and gaharu (agarwood or aloeswood) in Indonesia in the early 1990s. In Lao Cai and neighboring provinces, many fresh and processed products are sold domestically and to the Chinese markets just across the border, and demand is growing. As a result, what used to take the women only a few hours to collect, now requires several days of searching in the forests. Although Viet Nam has tremendous potential as a grower and producer of herbal medicine, it has gone from being an exporter to an importer of medicinal materials. 

Communities have become aware of the effects of forest destruction and over-exploitation and the dangers the “green goldmine” is facing. In 2017, Prime Minister Nguyễn Xuân Phúc urged government agencies and actors nationwide to develop measures to protect and promote traditional herbal medicines. He affirmed that such medicines are a treasure of the country, which can contribute to poverty reduction. He asked for solutions to tackle challenges in value and marketing chains, lower risks of extinction of many rare herbal plants, and careful use of advanced technology. 

Alliances by non-government organizations (NGO), Forest Protection Departments and local pharmaceutical companies have responded to the call for action. Jointly with local people, they have developed species and area management plans, enhanced capacities and benefit flows from the forest to the people. These initiatives are supported by, and aligned with, the new Forestry Law of 2017. This Law specifically prioritizes forest allocation to ethnic communities who have customary use of forests and recognizes communities as forest owners for the first time. The alliances have also helped to set up cooperatives to assist in the marketing of products. 

When the UN-REDD Viet Nam Phase II Programme launched its pilot activities in Lao Cai province, it was the “green goldmine” that connected the issues of forest carbon, local livelihoods and forest land tenure, presenting a promising formula for sustainable forest management. 

12 December 2019
English

Viet Nam infobrief series: Guiding stakeholder engagement for REDD+ implementation

uploaded by Leona Liu

*This is part of a series of info briefs produced in 2019 on the main lessons learned from Viet Nam's National REDD+ Programme 

This brief presents key issues that emerge from the assessment of stakeholder engagement and FPIC principles. It looks specifically into the extent to which guidelines, as the main tools, serve to provide possibilities for stakeholders who relate to, depend on, as well as manage the forest. This means that these guidelines are meant to guide stakeholder engagement through the entire process of planning, implementation, to monitoring and evaluation. 

At the policy level, the UN-REDD Viet Nam Phase II Programme has taken several positive steps towards enhancing stakeholder engagement. First, it has been a challenge to develop one single set of common guidelines for the site level, SiRAP. This is an important accomplishment as it lessens the confusion about the directives for stakeholder engagement. Second, the Programme has largely been managed to make use of and build on the local governance and planning mechanism in which stakeholder engagement is integrated. This is done through, for instance, making use of the scope for participation in the grassroots democracy ordinance for the planning and implementing REDD+ packages at the site level. Third, the objective of awareness raising set by the Programme was met to some extent despite the challenges in bridging different understandings of the key concepts of stakeholder engagement. Fourth, the Programme’s guidelines leave some room for change and flexibility during implementation. This is built on a general realisation that stakeholder engagement is a learning process. Fourth, the guidelines highlighted vulnerable stakeholders and in particular women and ethnic minorities. 

To accomplish stakeholder engagement and FPIC at site level is, however, an ambitious task, or rather, a long process. The attempt to integrate FPIC principle and benefit sharing pragmatically into one single document to guide stakeholder engagement adds to the challenge. The complex key elements of participation, transparency, accountability and representation will inevitably need contextualisation and adaptation at site level. For instance, to convey the full meaning of participation and adapt lessons into practice, which is central to engagement, take time and require changes in deep-rooted thinking and practices. Hence, formulating concise, contextual and concrete guidelines on stakeholder engagement and FPIC is a crucial, but difficult step in the process of accomplishing stakeholder engagement. The guidelines need to be short enough to be read and be useful, but still long enough to convey the meaning of key concepts and full value of stakeholder engagement. To add to the challenge, they need to be understood in a context very different from international principles and good practices from which they were written in the first place. Without a thorough understanding of what stakeholder engagement really means, there is a risk that stakeholder engagement and FPIC principles will only be respected on paper. Lastly, these challenges will inevitably increase for stakeholders from vulnerable groups who are weak in expressing their concerns such as women, ethnic minorities and other local communities living in or near the forest.

30 August 2019
Spanish

LA PARTICIPACIÓN DE LOS GRUPOS ÉTNICOS EN REDD+: ALGUNAS CONSIDERACIONES, RETOS Y OPORTUNIDADES PARA EL CASO DE COLOMBIA

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

Este documento busca contribuir a las discusiones que hoy en día se presentan en Colombia, entorno a las estrategias de reducción de la deforestación, a través de resumir los principales resultados relacionados generados en el proceso de preparación para REDD+ y la construcción de la Estrategia Integral de Control a la Deforestación y la Gestión de los Bosques “Bosques Territorios de Vida”, especialmente asociados al tema de participación social e involucramientos de actores; y los retos y oportunidades que se vislubran en la transición del nuevo gobierno y el nuevo Plan Nacional de Desarrollo- “ Pacto por Colombia 2018-2022”.

03 August 2019
Spanish

Informe Metodológico de ONU-REDD sobre Género

uploaded by Elizabeth Eggerts

Informe Metodológico de ONU-REDD sobre Género

05 July 2019
Spanish

Lista de Verificacion para Talleres Sensibles a las Cuestiones de Genero

uploaded by Elizabeth Eggerts

Esta simple lista de verificación se ha preparado para ayudar a los organizadores de los talleres a diseñar y aplicar talleres sensibles a las cuestiones de género a nivel regional, nacional o local.

05 July 2019
French

Liste de Controle pour les Ateliers Sensibles au Genre

uploaded by Elizabeth Eggerts

Cette liste de contrôle simplifiée a été préparée de sorte à assister les organisateurs dans la conception et la réalisation d’ateliers prenant en compte la dimension du genre, ceci aux niveaux régional, national ou local.

05 July 2019
English

Checklist for Gender-Responsive Workshops (also in SP/FR

uploaded by Elizabeth Eggerts

In its efforts to support its partner countries and development practitioners in meaningfully integrating a gender perspective into their policies and institutional commitments for REDD+, the UN-REDD Programme has developed a Checklist for Gender-Responsive Workshops. It is a simple, concise and easy to use two-page checklist that provides concrete guidance for workshop organizers in designing and implementing gender-responsive REDD+ workshops at the regional, national or local levels. This, in turn, can help all women and men REDD+ stakeholders in equitably and meaningfully participating in national and sub-national REDD+ action. The checklist is available on the UN-REDD Workspace in English, French and Spanish.

05 July 2019
English

UN-REDD Gender Marker Information Brief

uploaded by Elizabeth Eggerts

This Information Brief provides key details about the UN-REDD Gender Marker Rating System which was created in 2017 to track and monitor the gender responsiveness of UN-REDD’s technical assistance.

08 May 2019
English

Nesting: Reconciling REDD+ at Multiple Scales (An Asia-Pacific Perspective)

uploaded by Leona Liu

Nesting: Reconciling REDD+ at Multiple Scales - An Asia-Pacific Perspective

There are as many drivers of deforestation and forest degradation that lead to forest emissions as there are ways to mitigate them. In a given area, various actors – from local communities to private companies – may all be engaged in actions that reduce emissions, from sustainable agricultural intensification to reforestation and forest restoration plans. At the same time, the national government may implement land-tenure reform. All these actions contribute to reducing emissions resulting from deforestation and forest degradation.

02 April 2019
English

Advancing on REDD+ Module 5: Stakeholder Engagement in REDD+

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

This module of the REDD+ Academy Course Advancing on REDD+ describes the importance of stakeholder engagement in REDD+ processes, as well as the tools and entry points to promote stakeholder engegement. 

26 February 2019
English

Info Brief: South-South Cooperation Ghana and Ecuador

uploaded by Ela Ionescu

Info Brief: South-South Cooperation Ghana and Ecuador

This brief contains experiences and lessons learned from South-South Knowledge Exchange between Ghana and Ecuador.

07 February 2019
English

Info Brief: Exposure to Risks Posed by Unsustainable Land Use: What Can Burmese Banks Do?

uploaded by Leona Liu

Exposure to Risks Posed by Unsustainable Land Use: What Can Burmese Banks Do?

Land use is the foundation of the Burmese economy. As the Burmese banking sector develops and expands, it will be exposed to new challenges associated with unsustainable land use and deforestation. This brief is the second in a two-part series; the first info brief examined how the Burmese banking sector could be exposed to risk generated through unsustainable land use and deforestation. This second part focuses on measures that Burmese banks can take to minimize any exposure to unsustainable land use and deforestation, while aligning their portfolio with sustainable and profitable businesses that are able to foster and reinforce a healthy functioning environment.

06 February 2019
English

Scoping Private Sector Opportunities in Ethiopia: How to Stimulate Both Economic Development and REDD+ Implementation?

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

Scoping Private Sector Opportunities in Ethiopia: How to Stimulate Both Economic Development and REDD+ Implementation?

Ethiopia is one of the fastest-growing economies in Africa. Agriculture (subsistence and commercial) employs 80% of the population, contributes to 50% of the gross domestic product and provides 60% of export revenues, highlighting the importance of the sector for Ethiopia’s economy. At the same time, the country is experiencing ongoing deforestation, with agriculture being the principal driver of deforestation in Ethiopia. There are 2 national strategies - the climate-resilience green economy (CRGE) and the second-growth transformation plan (GTP2) - to shift the country to a more sustainable development paradigm while growing to middle-income status by 2025. Ethiopia has ample indigenous bamboo resources: the largest area of bamboo in Africa with 1 million hectares with a potential of 3 million hectares. Based on desk research and interviews, this report concludes that investments in bamboo carry the highest potential to restore, protect or recover forests as Ethiopia committed in 2014 to restore 15 million hectares by 2030. In doing so, there may be possibilities to harness the potential of both international development finance institutions as well as domestic financial institutions, given that Ethiopia is at the moment an underbanked country with little domestic or international funding flowing to forest-friendly projects that contribute to REDD+.

27 November 2018
English

Info Brief: South-South Cooperation Ghana and Ecuador

uploaded by Ela Ionescu

Info Brief: South-South Cooperation Ghana and Ecuador

This brief contains experiences and lessons learned from South-South Knowledge Exchange between Ghana and Ecuador.

20 November 2018
English

Banking on Forests in Myanmar

uploaded by Leona Liu

Banking on Forests in Myanmar

This info brief is supported by the UN-REDD Programme and published by the United Nations Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific. It is the first in a two-part series that is intended to demonstrate the economic and financial benefits of a deforestation-free approach to lending and investment in Myanmar and to provide recommendations for financial institutions on how to reduce their exposure to the forest-related risks arising from their clients/ investees’ activities.

13 September 2018
English

Economic and Financial Challenges to Scaling Up Sustainable Cocoa Production in Côte d’Ivoire - Executive Summary

uploaded by Michael Muratha

Economic and Financial Challenges to Scaling Up Sustainable Cocoa Production in Côte d’Ivoire - Executive Summary

At the current rate of deforestation, Côte d’Ivoire is in the process of irretrievably losing all its forest cover by 2034. The country is the world’s largest producer of cocoa. The extension of farmland for cocoa cultivation is one of the main drivers of deforestation. Declining soil fertility, diseases, aging plantations and the lack of good agricultural practices have led small cocoa producers in Côte d’Ivoire to seek better yields on forest lands.

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