Showing 163 result(s) for:
Tags: UNEP
23 May 2019
English

Enfoques jurisdiccionales de REDD+ en Africa: nuevas lecciones New

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

Este informe captura el Intercambio Regional de Conocimientos de UN-REDD África 2018 "Implementación de REDD+ a Escala": Nuevas lecciones sobre enfoques jurisdiccionales y vínculos con los marcos normativos nacionales", que se celebró los días 2 y 3 de octubre de 2018 en la Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Nairobi (Kenya).

23 May 2019
English

Approches juridictionnelles de la REDD+ en Afrique: enseignements émergents New

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

Cette note d'information est un compte rendu de l'échange régional de connaissances ONU-REDD Afrique 2018 "REDD+ Implementation at Scale : Emerging Lessons on Jurisdictional Approaches and Linkages with National Policy Frameworks " qui s'est tenue les 2 et 3 octobre 2018 à l'Office des Nations Unies à Nairobi, Kenya. Cette note d'information est la traduction du document en Anglais. 

21 May 2019
Spanish

Nota Informativa: Intercambion Sur-Sur Latinoamerica Gandaderia Sostenible y su relacion con los bosques New

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

Esta nota informativa recoge el intercambio regional de conocimientos Sur-Sur de UN-REDD sobre el tema de la ganadería y los bosques sostenibles que se celebró en Paraguay en noviembre de 2018. El documento resume los principales resultados del evento y enumera una serie de breves estudios de caso sobre diferentes países.

15 May 2019
English

Info Brief Africa Region Jurisdictional Approaches to REDD+ in Africa: emerging lessons

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

This info brief captures  the UN-REDD Africa Regional Knowledge Exchange 2018 “REDD+ Implementation at Scale: Emerging Lessons on Jurisdictional Approaches and Linkages with National Policy Frameworks” that was held on 2–3 October 2018 at the United Nations Office in Nairobi, Kenya

06 February 2019
English

Scoping private sector opportunities in Ethiopia: How to stimulate both economic development and REDD+ implementation?

uploaded by Alice Van der Elstraeten

Ethiopia is one of the fastest growing economies in Africa. Agriculture (subsistence and commercial) employs 80% of the population, contributes to 50% of the gross domestic

product and provides 60% of export revenues, highlighting the importance of the sector for Ethiopia’s economy. At the same time the country is experiencing ongoing

deforestation, with agriculture being the principal driver of deforestation in Ethiopia. There are 2 national strategies - the climate-resilience green economy (CRGE) and the

second growth transformation plan (GTP2) - to shift the country to a more sustainable development paradigm while growing to middle-income status by 2025. Ethiopia has ample indigenous bamboo resources: the largest area of bamboo in Africa with 1 million hectares with a potential of 3 million hectares. Based on desk research and

interviews, this report concludes that investments in bamboo carry the highest potential to restore, protect or recover forests as Ethiopia committed in 2014 to restore 15 million

hectares by 2030. In doing so, there may be possibilities to harness the potential of both international development finance institutions as well as domestic finance institutions, given that

Ethiopia is at the moment an underbanked country with little domestic or international funding flowing to forest-friendly projects that contribute to REDD+.

04 February 2019

အ ်ဥ္းခ်ဳပ္ ။ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံရွိသစ္ေတာမ်ားႏွင့္ ပတ္သ ္သည့္ ဘဏ္လုပ္ငန္း

uploaded by Leona Liu

This info brief is in Burmese. This info brief is supported by the UN-REDD Programme and published by the United Nations Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific. It is the first in a two-part series that is intended to demonstrate the economic and financial benefits of a deforestation-free approach to lending and investment in Myanmar and to provide recommendations for financial institutions on how to reduce their exposure to the forest-related risks arising from their clients/ investees’ activities. 

 

ဤအ ်ဥ္းခ်ဳပ္သည္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံ၌ ေငြထုတ္ေခ်းျခင္းႏွင့္

ရင္းႏွီးျမွဳပ္ႏွံမႈအေပၚ သစ္ေတာျပဳန္းတီးမႈ  င္းလြတ္ေသာ

ခ်ဥ္း ပ္မႈနည္းလမ္း၏ စီးပြားေရးႏွင့္ ဘ႑ာေရး

အ ်ိဳးေ ်းဇူးမ်ား ို သရုပ္ေဖာ္ျပရန္ ရည္ရြယ္ေသာ

ႏွစ္ပိုင္းတြဲအခန္း ဆ ္မွ ပထမပိုင္းျဖစ္သည္။

13 September 2018
English

Mining Sector Engagement And Integrated Landscape Management

uploaded by Michael Muratha

Forests cover around 45 million hectares in Zambia, or over 60% of the total land area. The Government of Zambia is aware of the prevailing high deforestation rate in the country, which is estimated between 250,000 – 300,000 hectares per year, and one of the top 10 countries with the highest deforestation rates in the world. The main direct drivers of forest degradation is charcoal production and illegal timber extraction, while drivers of deforestation are primarily agricultural and human-settlement expansion (Turpie et al, 2015). Mining activities play a key role in driving these activities, though there are regional and historical differences in forest transition patterns. The Government of Zambia decided in 2009 to participate in REDD+ as an opportunity to directly address the drivers of deforestation and forest degradation (Zambia, 2015).

13 September 2018
English

Production Durable De Cacao En Côte d’Ivoire : Besoins Et Solutions De Financement Pour Les Petits Producteurs

uploaded by Michael Muratha

MESSAGES CLEFS
◾L’agroforesterie pourrait être un élément essentiel de la réponse apportée à la situation
critique des forêts ivoiriennes. Elle permettrait également d’assurer le futur de la cacaoculture,
un secteur clef de l’économie du pays.
◾Pour cela, une définition nationale de l’agroforesterie incluant des éléments quantitatifs est
nécessaire pour orienter les investissements de manière cohérente avec les objectifs politiques
nationaux. Elle harmoniserait les objectifs socio-économiques et environnementaux.
◾Cette étude met en lumière plusieurs éléments pouvant guider le développement de cette
définition. Celle-ci devra prendre en compte les facteurs qui influencent les rendements
cacaoyers dans l’arbitrage entre coûts et bénéfices environnementaux et économiques
pour les différents acteurs de la chaîne de valeur cacao.
◾La transition vers l’agroforesterie peut entraîner un manque à gagner de plusieurs années.
Compte tenu de l’absence d’épargne des planteurs, des mécanismes de compensation de
ce manque à gagner lors des premières années de transition doivent être formulés.
◾La diversification des revenus du petit producteur à moyen terme grâce à l’introduction de
systèmes agroforestiers représente une opportunité d’amélioration de son niveau de vie et
une protection face à la fluctuation des cours du cacao en monoculture.

13 September 2018
English

Economic and Financial Challenges to Scaling Up Sustainable Cocoa Production in Côte d’Ivoire Executive Summary

uploaded by Michael Muratha

KEY MESSAGES
◾Agroforestry can play a key role in addressing the critical situation of Ivorian forests. It would also ensure the future of cocoa farming, a key sector of the country’s economy.
◾To that end, a national agroforestry definition including quantitative elements is needed to guide investments consistently with national policy objectives. It would also harmonise socioeconomic and environmental objectives.
◾This study highlights several elements that can guide the development of this definition. The latter should consider the factors that influence cocoa yields in the arbitration between environmental and economic costs and benefits for the different actors in the cocoa value chain.
◾The transition towards agroforestry can lead to a shortfall of several years. Given the plantation owners’ lack of savings, compensation mechanisms for this shortfall in the first years of transition must be formulated.
◾The diversification of smallholder income in the medium term through the introduction of agroforestry systems represents an opportunity to improve his/her standard of living and protect against the fluctuation of cocoa prices in monoculture.

06 August 2018
English
12 July 2018
English

ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL CHALLENGES TO SCALING UP SUSTAINABLE COCOA PRODUCTION IN CÔTE D’IVOIRE - executive summary

uploaded by Griet Ingrid Dierckxsens

Agroforestry can play a key role in addressing the critical situation of Ivorian forests. It would also ensure the future of cocoa farming, a key sector of the country’s economy. To that end, a national agroforestry definition including quantitative elements is needed to guide investments consistently with national policy objectives. It would also harmonise socioeconomic and environmental objectives. 

This study highlights several elements that can guide the development of this definition. The latter should consider the factors that influence cocoa yields in the arbitration between environmental and economic costs and benefits for the different actors in the cocoa value chain. 

The transition towards agroforestry can lead to a shortfall of several years. Given the plantation owners’ lack of savings, compensation mechanisms for this shortfall in the first years of transition must be formulated. The diversification of smallholder income in the medium term through the introduction of agroforestry systems represents an opportunity to improve his/her standard of living and protect against the fluctuation of cocoa prices in monoculture.

 

28 May 2018
English

ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL CHALLENGES TO SCALING UP SUSTAINABLE COCOA PRODUCTION IN CÔTE D’IVOIRE - executive summary

uploaded by Griet Ingrid Dierckxsens

Côte d’Ivoire has one of the fastest rates of deforestation in the world and the fastest in Africa. The most promising solutions to decouple agriculture from deforestation would be to increase agricultural productivity with improved plant material while making use of good practices (intensification) and to plant associated trees in cocoa plantations (agroforestry). 

In 2016, the Permanent REDD+ Executive Secretariat at the Ministry of Environment mandated a framing study on the private investment opportunities in Côte d’Ivoire. The main goal of this study on economic and financing models is to provide the government with useful information to assist ongoing private sector commitments, and to bring strategic data to other related initiatives (including the Cocoa and Forests initiative, the working group Environment and Climate Change from the cocoa sector Private-Public Partnership Platform or the Green Climate Fund). UN Environment is partnering with the European Forest Institute to design tangible financing models for deforestation-free cocoa agriculture by the private sector, in cooperation with the Ivorian state and its partners. The successful uptake of agroforestry in the cocoa production chain is a major component of the analysis.

 

25 May 2018
English

Forestry and Macroeconomic Accounts of Uganda: The Importance of Linking Ecosystem Services to Macroeconomics

uploaded by Griet Ingrid Dierckxsens

The purpose of this study is to analyse the economic value of Uganda’s forest resources, where possible, and demonstrate some policy instruments that would
alleviate pressure on these natural forest systems.

22 May 2018
English

Definition of the national approach and scope of REDD+ safeguards: lessons learned by Ecuador

uploaded by Elspeth Halverson

"Definition of the national approach and scope of REDD+ safeguards: Lessons learned from Ecuador" is now available in English. The Spanish version is found here.

The publication highlights the lessons learned from defining the national approach and scope of REDD+ safeguards in Ecuador.

11 April 2018
English

Forestry and Macroeconomic Accounts of Nigeria: The Importance of Linking Ecosystem Services to Macroeconomics (Full report)

uploaded by Griet Ingrid Dierckxsens

The purpose of this study is to analyse the economic value of Nigeria’s forest resources, where possible, placing added focus on resources found in the CRS, and demonstrate some policy instruments that would alleviate pressure on these natural forest systems. 

28 March 2018
English

Forestry and Macroeconomic Accounts of Nigeria: The Importance of Linking Ecosystem Services to Macroeconomics (Ex summary)

uploaded by Griet Ingrid Dierckxsens

The purpose of this study is to analyze the economic value of Nigeria’s forest resources and demonstrate some policy instruments that would alleviate pressure on these natural forest systems. The results show a rapid and severe rate of deforestation, results from a range of cumulative effects fundamentally driven by the immediate availability of woody biomass in the form of timber, fuelwood and construction timber; and the opportunity to acquire land for significantly higher agricultural returns. Together, these drivers comprise a considerable economic incentive for deforestation.

The total value of forest ecosystem services based on valuations done between 2000 and 2015 is approximately 1,000,000 Naira/ha. Although value is derived through forest use, the unsustainable exploitation thereof and subsequent deforestation results in a net loss to the economy of Nigeria. 

These losses will continue for as long as there is a disconnect between the cost-benefit decisions made by land holders, users and other indirect role players, where the net benefit of deforestation is highly positive; and the cost-benefit ratio at a national scale, which, as demonstrated above, is highly negative.

Thus, to address the unique deforestation challenges faced by Nigeria, this study not only uses accounting and valuation of natural capital, but also makes significant progress towards designing and testing policy instruments that goes to the heart of the country’s deforestation problem

The analysis shows that the contribution of forests to the economy of Nigeria is underestimated in the national accounts.

Furthermore, the study demonstrates three economic policy instruments that seek to incentivise landholders to pursue sustainable forest management. These proposed policy options are not intended to be a comprehensive final set of options for Nigeria, but are rather used to demonstrate how these options could work, what they would cost, to what extent they would curb deforestation and what the relative costs and benefits to the economy of Nigeria would behe three preliminary policy options tested are: (i) Carbon trade; (ii) Certified plantation forestry and (iii) Agroforestry.

08 March 2018
English

The contribution of forests to national income in Ethiopia and linkages with REDD+ (Full report)

uploaded by Griet Ingrid Dierckxsens

OBJECTIVES:

In 2014, the Government of Ethiopia requested the UN-REDD Programme to
support the country in assessing the contribution of forest ecosystems to national
income in the context of the national REDD+ process. The primary objective of the
project was to establish the contribution of Ethiopian forests to national income3
(GDP) by assessing the following.
◾ Value added of the forestry sector: The annual contribution of the production
of forest ecosystem goods and services to GDP attributed to the forestry industry in the Ethiopian System of National Accounts (ESNA).
◾ Contribution of forest ecosystems to other sectors: The annual contribution of the production of forest ecosystem goods and services to GDP attributed
to other industries in the ESNA (for example, the contribution of forest-based
insect pollinators to the value added of the agriculture industry or the contribution of protected areas to the tourism industry).
◾ Non-market benefts: the annual contribution of forest ecosystems to
non-market income in Ethiopia (which is conceptually beyond the scope of
national accounting and therefore not included in GDP).
The contribution of forest ecosystems to national income is seen as a vital element
of the case for forest conservation in Ethiopia. Prior to this study, no full assessment of the income derived from forest-derived goods and services had been
undertaken in the forestry sector or other sectors. The only fgure available had
been the offcial ESNA estimate (MOFEC, 2015) of the contribution of the forestry
industry to GDP (3.8% in 2012-13). By assessing the full contribution of forests to
market and non-market income, a more complete picture of their economic importance emerges.

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